R+CO CREATIVE DIRECTOR AMANDA WALL REVEALS HER INSPIRATION BEHIND BRIGHT SHADOWS

Jan / 31


R+CO CREATIVE DIRECTOR AMANDA WALL REVEALS HER INSPIRATION BEHIND BRIGHT SHADOWS

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BRIGHT SHADOWS: The name bubbles with contradictions—and that’s exactly how R+Co Creative Director Amanda Walls wants it to be. Assigned to R+Co’s new line of root touch-up sprays, the moniker describes a product that delicately covers grays or color inconsistencies you’d like to keep under wraps in a formula that is lightweight, extremely touchable and shine-provoking (rather than dusty and dulling). But the name—it allures while making you scratch your head (in a good way!). We chatted with Wall about how she came up with BRIGHT SHADOWS’ name and intriguing packaging.

What would you say inspired your direction with BRIGHT SHADOWS most: formula, use or end result?
Definitely functionality and end result are equal to me, because those two are the most important part for the consumer. If the package says cereal, you want cereal in the end, right? The whole process is a fun way to give the product a personality that speaks toward the function.

How did you come up with the name BRIGHT SHADOWS It seems like a total contradiction.
The thing about naming products—it’s honestly never the first name you want because other brands own that name! So you have to get a little creative to come up with something that is truly unique. With BRIGHT SHADOWS it was very simple to me: It was the idea of hiding something—being in the shadows—but also illuminating it and coming into the light. I love the contradiction of the two words. Often root cover-ups can be gunky and heavy—ours isn’t!—so I wanted something that conveyed “light” in both how it feels and how it looks, and that has a little edge.

How do you feel BRIGHT SHADOWS as a name encapsulates the whole range of seven colors?
It allows for a whole spectrum of colors. I could have named them individually but I thought that would be confusing for the consumer. The name should always be approachable and comfortable.

For the background imagery, you’re known for selecting visuals that not only aren’t typical for haircare, but also act as allusions to the product name or functionality. Where do you look for inspiration?
My own visual library comes from many different places: film, music, art, and random fun trends I see on Instagram. I’m really open to all forms of inspiration. 

Do you feel like your background as a model, painter and Purple magazine contributor informs your inspiration?
I think it all contributes in my personal aesthetic and, in turn, the direction of the brand and what I think is interesting and what I think inspires people beyond a plain bottle. The people I hang out with are artists, fashion designers and photographers, and they all very much influence how I see things.

You mentioned that the bottle shape also directs how you choose a visual.
Yes. They pose limitations on the freedom of what you can do. Like a big can of hairspray, for instance: I can do a lot more with that than a tiny little pump, you know? So the bottle shape itself can determine what I pick as a packaging image.

For BRIGHT SHADOWS in particular, how did you come up with the visual? Is it silk sheets?
It’s a shadow of a hand! (Laughs.) It could be a wave, a high-five or a hello. I wanted a nice, friendly, open image. And I love images of hands. I think they represent this idea of creativity, which I think is great for hairdressers since they work with their hands. Plus, they’ll be using their hands to bring this product to life.